Diary

Everyday matters from the life among dogs and wolves

Anectotes from the daily life among dogs and wolves: our students, trainees and collaborators cover the newest ongoings at the WSC.

Entries 11 - 15 of 658

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  • Animal creativity

    (31.08.2017, Laura Candelotto)

    To perform an experiment in which the wolves and dogs first need to learn how to use an apparatus, isn’t an easy task. Even more so, if one is working under time pressure. However, there will probably be nothing more amusing than observing how many different, often quite creative methods, those animals have to approach a new task.

  • Farewell

    And so, it has come: the time to bid farewell and leave the Wolf Science Center (WSC). (27.08.2017, Monica Boada Maza)
    Fotowand im WSC-Haus

    I can’t help but look back to one year ago. Last year around these dates I was exchanging emails with one of the founders of the WSC, telling her how eager I was to come and get involved in any project.

  • When bones are cracking

    (28.07.2017, Viola Magierski)

    Keeping carnivores in captivity is certainly an interesting an explosive topic. Very often, visitors ask us how we feed the wolves and what kind of food they get.

  • The Chocolate Lady

    (11.07.2017, Lina Oberließen)

    The Chocolate Lady is a living legend here at the WSC and has been sweetening the life of trainers and students for many years. She is a legend because only few of us have ever seen her, and even fewer know her real name.

  • From free-ranging dogs to wolves

    (27.06.2017, Debottam Bhattacharjee)

    Life is all about exploring and knowing different things. Working in the field of animal behaviour has given me such an opportunity. I always loved dogs, but never thought of doing research in it. For me, they were Man’s best friend, roaming everywhere freely in the streets of India. One cannot really tease apart the behaviours by just looking at them. When I first started working on free-ranging dogs, my curiosity level increased drastically. It is surprising how these animals share the same environment with humans and utilize almost similar ecological niche.